Welcome to the New Seahawk Script!

This is the website for the AP English Literature’s online literary magazine, The Seahawk Script. This site will function much like the previous site, but has a new look. We have tried to make this resource more accessible to students, with clearly defined sections. Please explore this site, and discover all the exciting content created by students. New articles will be posted regularly, so make sure you check back often! You can also choose to follow this blog by putting in an email address. Just look on the sidebar for the follow widget. New articles will appear below, so make sure to check in regularly!

We hope you enjoy our site!

Proficiency-Based Grading by Hannah Morley

It is widely known that Boothbay Region High School will be moving towards proficiency-based grading in the year to come. However, many students, parents, and teachers do not know what this change will entail. As a student of Boothbay Region High School, I had always been very against standards based grading with a lot of different concerns: such as, What will colleges think looking at only standards? How will parents and students be able to make sense of the new four-point scale?

When preparing to write this editorial, I held a very strong opinion against the proficiency-based grading and went to the school principal, Mr. Welch, to get further evidence. While talking to Mr. Welch about the proficiency-based grading, I realized it was not going to be the same grading we had in middle school, and that the opinions of most of those against the new system are mostly based on misinformation.

How will proficiency-based grading work? Teachers and administrators are still in the process of figuring that out, but what I have gathered through my interview with Mr. Welch is that there are two possible options. The first would be the standards that students are required to meet and their GPAs would be completely separate. This would mean that students would choose pieces of school work that they felt exemplified proficiency in the standards. These would not affect the student’s GPA at all.

The second option is that the GPA would be based on the standards. Each standard would be worth a certain amount of points that would be entered into the grade book and would count towards the student’s overall GPA. The issue with this option, is the question of whether teachers would individually come up with the conversion of points from a four point scale to a 100 point scale, or if there will be a school-wide conversion chart. My recommendation if this were the option the school was going to go with, would be a school-wide conversion chart so students know the expectations are the same in every class.

How will the school decide if a student is proficient in the different categories? The implication of a program known as Richer Picture will allow for students to submit the work they have done in the classroom that demonstrate their proficiency. Even though the administrators and teachers have been working hard to come up with the system that will work best for the students, there is still work to be done and much to be decided. More information will be presented later in the year when more has been decided.

I personally believe that the school should have the proficiency-based grading and the GPA separate from each other so that it does not affect the students’ GPAs. This would allow for a compromise between those who are in favor of the standards and those who are not. This way students would still have to meet all of the standards for graduation, but their GPA would be calculated the same way as before.

Community Service Opportunities

If you’re stuck on ideas about how to obtain your five community service hours, check here to find good places to go that could use your help! Email Angela Machon (angelamachon@csd3-brhs.org) to add any organizations that are looking for some help

Mrs. Lorrain in the guidance office is also a great resource!

Resources

Our goal at The Script is to provide a site rich with information for students and faculty, and the community. Please bookmark these links in your browser and take full advantage of the resources.
Boothbay Region High School
Community
– Booster Club Facebook Page

Academic
                                                                             –Maine Scholastic Art and Writing Competitions
Library

First Annual Job Fair

On March 16th, all students from grade 8 through 12 was given a chance to browse just a few of the summer job and career opportunities open to them.  There were 28 tables set up by local and community organizations.  Some of the organizations include the Coast Guard, Hannaford, Boothbay Register, and Boothbay Harbor Country Club, just to name a few.  The event went on all day to give each student ample time to get ideas about different career options.  The job fair was a requirement of the Melmac Grant granted by the Melmac Education Foundation for $18,000.

Political Caucuses

The Lincoln County republican and democratic caucuses took place on March 5th and 6th, respectively.  A little over 700 people attended the March 5th Republican Caucus at Wiscasset Middle High School.  U.S. Senator Ted Cruz received 325 of 746 votes and won with 43.5% of votes. New York billionaire Donald Trump received 270 votes or 36.1%. Ohio Governor John Kasich received 92 votes or 12.3% and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio received 50 votes or 6.7%.  In the state of Maine, Senator Cruz won the Maine caucus with 45.8% of votes. Trump received 32.6% of votes.  Kasich earned 12.2% of votes and Rubio received 6.6%.  On Sunday, March 6th, the democratic caucus was held around Lincoln County.  Almost 3,000 people came out to support their candidate and cast their vote in the primary election.  At the end of the day, Hillary Clinton ended with a total of 30 delegates.  Bernie Sanders ended with a total of 61 delegates from around Lincoln County.  Sanders also won the State of Maine caucus with a total of 64.9 percent of all votes.