Shakespeare Is Invading the AP Literature Class

Throughout this past week, we have been reading Hamlet in class, portraying different characters and discussing the meanings behind Shakespeare’s words. While we had only made it through about Act I, we still decided to go and watch the performance anyways. The performance we watched wasn’t done live, but in fact being streamed to the theater in Damariscotta. A fellow student, Madison Stahle thinks “The play was engaging in how it was an accurate depiction of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, with a modern twist.” Despite how long the production was, a little over three hours, and the Shakespearean English, many students still found it to be entertaining and enjoyed the show. Another student, Molly Thibault thought “It was a very well put together production. It really helped me understand the language of the play by seeing it in action.” Overall it was a good experience for our class to create a deeper understanding of Shakespeare’s work.

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Poem of the Week: Novemeber 28th-November

Remember

Joy Harjo, 1951

Remember the sky that you were born under,
know each of the star’s stories.
Remember the moon, know who she is.
Remember the sun’s birth at dawn, that is the
strongest point of time. Remember sundown
and the giving away to night.
Remember your birth, how your mother struggled
to give you form and breath. You are evidence of
her life, and her mother’s, and hers.
Remember your father. He is your life, also.
Remember the earth whose skin you are:
red earth, black earth, yellow earth, white earth
brown earth, we are earth.
Remember the plants, trees, animal life who all have their
tribes, their families, their histories, too. Talk to them,
listen to them. They are alive poems.
Remember the wind. Remember her voice. She knows the
origin of this universe.
Remember you are all people and all people
are you.
Remember you are this universe and this
universe is you.
Remember all is in motion, is growing, is you.
Remember language comes from this.
Remember the dance language is, that life is.
Remember.

Rolling into Robotics!

      Right now at BRHS Ms. Higgins’ Advanced Robotics class is preparing to compete in the regional VEX competition, where groups of students are tasked with designing and building a robot to compete with other teams from around the world. The skills that the students learn in the class are put to the test on competition day as students learn lifelong skills in leadership, teamwork, and communication.

The Holiday Cheer is Lighting Up BRHS

img_0903The Festival of Lights and Gardens Aglow have been taking over our small town. Driving through town you’ll see many businesses and restaurants that are decked out in twinkling lights. Our school will soon be added to the list. On Tuesday, November 22nd, BRHS seniors will spend the day decorating our school so it can glow along with the rest of the illuminated town. This will be the second year that Gardens Aglow has been bringing business to our little town. This year they doubled the size of the display as well as the number of lights; the previous year there was 130,000 lights and now this year there are 360,000. Last year 36,000 people arrived to view this beautiful light show. This year they plan to bring in more visitors, around 50,000. Some factors that they hope to contribute to the growing number of visitors are: the larger amount of the lights, more food options, including food trucks and a s’mores station, and the 2 free tickets that were sent out to home within Boothbay, Southport, Edgecomb, East Boothbay, and Boothbay Harbor. There is also a competition that the Botanical Gardens is putting on which is a contest for residents of the town that live on a public road. The goal of the contest is to have the prettiest, biggest, and brightest display in town. The first place winner receives $2,500! Our school can’t wait to participate in this community-wide phenomena.

Poem of the Week: November 21st- November 27th

The Poem of the Week this week has the theme of ambition. With students applying for college and scholarships, along with just dealing with difficult courses, we all can use some ambition. This poem fits nicely and provides a bit of encouragement.

It Couldn’t Be Done

Edgar Guest, 18811959

Somebody said that it couldn’t be done,
But he with a chuckle replied
That “maybe it couldn’t,” but he would be one
Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried.
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
On his face. If he worried he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.

Somebody scoffed: “Oh, you’ll never do that;
At least no one ever has done it”;
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat,
And the first thing we knew he’d begun it.
With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
There are thousands to prophesy failure;
There are thousands to point out to you one by one,
The dangers that wait to assail you.
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
Just take off your coat and go to it;
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing
That “cannot be done,” and you’ll do it.

Politics Take Over BRHS

With the election approaching, political events have become prominent at our school. Senator Angus King came to speak with the students on Thursday about his role in government and provided ample time for questions to be asked. Students were provided with an inside look at what being a senator is really like: the constant traveling, his various responsibilities, and the time he makes for his family.  The following day we were provided with an inside look at the junior AP Language classes debate that included a local, state, and federal issue. The issues debated were in regard to the roundabout, legalization of recreational marijuana, and the presidential race. They began with opening statements, then debated back and forth in a  civil manner, followed by opening the discussion to the audience, and ending with the closing statements. They followed this structure for each question that was debated. Concluding the political take over at BRHS, will be the mock election held on Tuesday, November 8th, which is also election day. Students registered to vote on the 7th which was required for the voting process the next day. The mock election will take place during CORE and students will be given the opportunity during that time to place their vote on questions that are going to be on the November 8th ballot.

Poem of the Week: November 7th-November 13th

Since tomorrow is election day, the poem of the week is about America. “Let America Be America Again” was written by Langston Hughes, an African American poet born in 1902. His work mostly revolved around black life in America from the twenties to the sixties. In this poem Hughes presents his commentary on the American Dream and offers satiric criticism over the reality of equality in America.

“Let America Be America Again”

Langston Hughes, 1902 – 1967

Let America be America again.

Let it be the dream it used to be.

Let it be the pioneer on the plain

Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed—

Let it be that great strong land of love

Where never kings connive nor tyrants scheme

That any man be crushed by one above.

(It never was America to me.)

O, let my land be a land where Liberty

Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath,

But opportunity is real, and life is free,

Equality is in the air we breathe.

(There’s never been equality for me,

Nor freedom in this “homeland of the free.”)

Say, who are you that mumbles in the dark?

And who are you that draws your veil across the stars?

I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,

I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars.

I am the red man driven from the land,

I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek—

And finding only the same old stupid plan

Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.

I am the young man, full of strength and hope,

Tangled in that ancient endless chain

Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land!

Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need!

Of work the men! Of take the pay!

Of owning everything for one’s own greed!

I am the farmer, bondsman to the soil.

I am the worker sold to the machine.

I am the Negro, servant to you all.

I am the people, humble, hungry, mean—

Hungry yet today despite the dream.

Beaten yet today—O, Pioneers!

I am the man who never got ahead,

The poorest worker bartered through the years.

Yet I’m the one who dreamt our basic dream

In the Old World while still a serf of kings,

Who dreamt a dream so strong, so brave, so true,

That even yet its mighty daring sings

In every brick and stone, in every furrow turned

That’s made America the land it has become.

O, I’m the man who sailed those early seas

In search of what I meant to be my home—

For I’m the one who left dark Ireland’s shore,

And Poland’s plain, and England’s grassy lea,

And torn from Black Africa’s strand I came

To build a “homeland of the free.”

The free?

Who said the free?  Not me?

Surely not me?  The millions on relief today?

The millions shot down when we strike?

The millions who have nothing for our pay?

For all the dreams we’ve dreamed

And all the songs we’ve sung

And all the hopes we’ve held

And all the flags we’ve hung,

The millions who have nothing for our pay—

Except the dream that’s almost dead today.

O, let America be America again—

The land that never has been yet—

And yet must be—the land where every man is free.

The land that’s mine—the poor man’s, Indian’s, Negro’s, ME—

Who made America,

Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,

Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,

Must bring back our mighty dream again.

Sure, call me any ugly name you choose—

The steel of freedom does not stain.

From those who live like leeches on the people’s lives,

We must take back our land again,

America!

O, yes,

I say it plain,

America never was America to me,

And yet I swear this oath—

America will be!

Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,

The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,

We, the people, must redeem

The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.

The mountains and the endless plain—

All, all the stretch of these great green states—

And make America again!

(https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/let-america-be-america-again)